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National Center for Campus Public Safety

Weekly Snapshot

The Weekly Snapshot, our electronic bulletin, features timely resources and information for campus communities, public safety and emergency management officials, law enforcement officers, and others interested in making campuses safer. The bulletin includes reports and studies issued from government agencies, non-profit organizations, and professional associations on topics such as sexual assault, mental health, travel and study abroad safety, community relations, harassment, and emergency preparedness. In addition, the Weekly Snapshot provides information on national monthly observances and campaign organization, legislative updates, federal awareness bulletins, and information on upcoming events and professional training opportunities. Anyone may subscribe to this email communication, along with other NCCPS notifications, by joining our mailing list.

We have compiled our past Weekly Snapshot articles into one easily accessible and searchable location, the Weekly Snapshot Directory. This directory will be updated monthly.


August 21, 2019

In this issue:

  • September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month: This September marks the 11th annual observance of National Campus Safety Awareness Month (NCSAM), a month-long awareness campaign that first launched in 2008 by the Clery Center with unanimous support from Congress. This year's campaign theme, Bridging the Gap, focuses on campus safety prevention and response work that is commonly confused or misunderstood.
  • Get Ready for Hazing Prevention Week: National Hazing Prevention Week (NHPW) takes place September 23-27, and is an opportunity for university and college campuses, K-12 schools, communities, organizations, and individuals to join together and raise awareness about hazing, educate others about hazing's impact, and ways to prevent it.

Open Issue


August 14, 2019

In this issue:

  • National Preparedness Month Is Coming: September is National Preparedness Month (NPM), a time to promote family and community disaster and emergency planning. This year's overarching theme is "Prepared, Not Scared. Be Ready for Disasters." The goal is to increase the number of individuals, families and communities that engage in preparedness actions for a potential disaster or emergency.
  • Engage Your Campus in Suicide Prevention: September is a busy time, filled with orientations, trainings, and national observances. One of the most important, in light of continuing research confirming the rising number of students struggling with anxiety and depression, is National Suicide Prevention Month. Campus prevention coordinators and other campus and student leaders can find suicide prevention resources in a variety of locations to use this September and throughout the year.

Open Issue


August 7, 2019

In this issue:

  • Important Resources Following El Paso and Dayton Tragedies and HSIN Access: On Sunday, August 4 th, the FBI held a phone call with federal, state, and local partners discussing the mass casualty incidents that happened over the weekend in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio. As a follow up, the Office for State and Local Law Enforcement emailed a compilation of law enforcement sensitive (LES) information from both incidents and a suite of products and services made available by federal partners. In order to access these LES and/or For Official Use Only (FOUO) materials, law enforcement officials are encouraged to join the Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN). Many applicants are sworn police officers; however, non-sworn campus safety officers who are sponsored by their local municipal police department may be eligible for access to specific communities.
  • Make a Difference for Campus Fire Safety Month: September is National Campus Fire Safety Month (NCSFM), a time to raise awareness among parents, students, administrators, and legislators about the importance of fire safety. Now in its fifteenth year, and proclaimed annually by several states, NCFSM is coordinated each year by Massachusetts-based Campus Firewatch on behalf of parents who have lost children in college-related fires.

Open Issue


July 31, 2019

In this issue:

  • Time is Running Out for Virtual Professional Development: For the past year, we've been delighted to offer two Virtual Professional Development (VPD) programs to our stakeholders at no-cost through a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Program, U.S. Department of Justice. Unfortunately, this funding has run out and our VPD initiative will be closing down on Wednesday, August 7, 2019.  
  • Understanding and Addressing Implicit Bias: Every person holds implicit bias or implicit social cognition, defined by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at The Ohio State University as the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These associations develop over the course of a lifetime beginning at a very early age through exposure to direct and indirect messages. In addition to early life experiences, the media and news programming are often-cited origins of implicit associations.
  • Is Your Campus Bike Friendly?: On college and university campuses, students and staff not walking to class are probably riding a bicycle. Although there is a presence of skateboards, longboards, electric scooters, and hoverboards on campus, bicycles continue to be the most commonly used form of alternative transportation. Bicycle-friendly campuses need established and communicated bike safety regulations and awareness information.

Open Issue


July 24, 2019

In this issue:

  • Body Cameras' Effect on Field Interviews: A new study published by the National Police Foundation (NPF) examines how the use of body cameras affects victim and witness interactions with police officers who are wearing them. The study, Do Body Cameras Affect the Quality of Victim-Police Interactions in Field Interviews?, was prompted by previous research efforts that have suggested body cameras may have significant impacts on officer use of force and on citizen complaints against the police, as well as privacy concerns and reticence in having an official video record of speaking with police.
  • IEDs and Bomb-Making Awareness and Prevention: The Office for Bombing Prevention manages the Bomb-Making Materials Awareness Program (BMAP), which is designed to be integrated into existing state and local outreach and liaison programs, community policing efforts, and private sector security and training programs. With school and campus bomb threats continuing to occur year after year, building a BMAP on your campus can help build local awareness about how powerful explosives can be built from common consumer goods. This is a proactive safety approach your campus can build into existing prevention programming, training, and outreach.

Open Issue


July 17, 2019

In this issue:

  • Healthcare Facilities Preparedness: Many universities are integrated with robust healthcare facilities on campus. Some examples include the University of Alabama Hospital at Birmingham, University Medical Center at Princeton, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and the University of Vermont Medical Center. These medical centers serve the needs of patients and their families 24 hours a day, seven days a week and need to maintain a continuity of care and operations no matter the circumstances. Because of this "duty-to-care" commitment, hospitals and healthcare facilities face unique challenges when planning and responding to critical incidents.
  • Alcohol and Drug Misuse, Suicide, and Millennials: In June, Trust for America's Health (TFAH), a nonprofit, nonpartisan public health policy, research, and advocacy organization, and the Well Being Trust (WBT), a national foundation dedicated to advancing the mental, social, and spiritual health of the nation, released the issue brief Alcohol and Drug Misuse and Suicide and the Millennial Generation - A Devastating Report. TFAH and WBT have called for immediate and sustained attention and investment in a national resilience strategy to address the rising death toll of Americans from alcohol- and drug-induced fatalities and suicide.

Open Issue


July 10, 2019

In this issue:

  • Minority Mental Health Awareness Month: July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, an observance that was announced by the U.S. House of Representatives in May 2008 and officially named for Bebe Moore Campbell, an author, advocate, co-founder of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Urban Los Angeles, and national spokesperson who passed away in November 2006 from cancer. She received NAMI's 2003 Outstanding Media Award for Literature and advocated for mental health education and support among individuals of diverse communities.
  • Alcohol Policies on Campus: If a college or university receives federal funds, they are required by law to have alcohol policies posted on their websites and distributed to students and employees. A recent review by researchers from the Maryland Collaborative sought to answer some important questions about alcohol policies at institutions of higher education (IHEs), including 1) are they easy to find, 2) can students understand them, and 3) are they effective at curbing or eliminating underage and binge drinking?

Open Issue


July 3, 2019

In this issue:

  • Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places: Soft targets and crowded places are typically defined as locations or environments that are easily accessible, attract large numbers of people on a predictable or semi-predictable basis, and may be vulnerable to attacks using simple tactics and readily available weapons. This includes schools, parks, restaurants, shopping centers, special event venues, and transportation systems. These types of environments are increasingly appealing to terrorists and other extremist actors because of their relative accessibility and the large number of potential targets. The challenge of securing these environments and reducing risk is complicated by the common use of simple tactics and less sophisticated attacks.
  • New Campus Resilience Program Exercise Starter Kits Available: Last month, the Department of Homeland Security's Office of Academic Engagement (OAE) released four new Exercise Starter Kits (ESKs) as part of the Campus Resilience (CR) Program. The new starter kits focus on the following scenarios: improvised explosive device, hazardous material release, tornado, and earthquake.

Open Issue


June 26, 2019

In this issue:

  • SUNY Announces New SPARC Upgrade: In 2019, the State University of New York (SUNY), in collaboration with the City University of New York (CUNY), launched a significant upgrade to the Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Response Course (SPARC), an online training system to assist colleges and universities in training students, especially more difficult to reach or underserved populations including non-traditional, distance education, part-time, and military students.
  • Safety Tips for the July 4th Holiday: Although some colleges and universities are closed for the summer, many have summer programs, courses, or year-round schedules that mean students are on campus during the summer months. It's important to share safety tips with your campus community for the July Fourth holiday, especially since fireworks, heat, impaired driving, and other risks go hand-in-hand.

Open Issue


June 19, 2019

In this issue: 

  • PTSD Awareness: June is PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) Awareness Month and June 27 is PTSD Awareness Day, originally designated by the U.S. Senate in 2014 and 2010, respectively. PTSD is a mental health problem that some people may develop after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event such as military combat, sexual assault, a natural disaster, or a car accident. For some people, incidents like these evoke upsetting memories or create problems returning to their normal routine for several weeks or months. Not every person develops chronic (ongoing) or acute (short-term) PTSD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD. 
  • Have You Applied for HSIN Access?: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to sharing timely, relevant, and accurate information with its campus safety and law enforcement partners. Members of these communities raised questions about access to intelligence and analytical products, noting that these items are essential for maintaining situational awareness and safety. To meet these needs, the Office of Partnership and Engagement/Office for State and Local Law Enforcement, with assistance from the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis, is facilitating requests for Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN) membership for interested campus safety/police departments.

Open Issue



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