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National Center for Campus Public Safety

Weekly Snapshot Archives - 2014/10

October 30, 2014

In this issue:

  • MIT Climate Survey Coincides with National Estimates: On Monday, MIT announced the results of a campus-wide survey that was launched in spring 2014. Of MIT's 10,831 students, 3,844 responded, or 35%. One in six female undergraduates, who had responded anonymously, said they had been sexually assaulted, (defined in the survey as unwanted sexual contact, from touching to penetration, "involving use of force, physical threat or incapacitation")but only five percent reported the crime to any campus official. Further, five percent of male undergraduates who responded said they had been sexually assaulted. University President L. Rafael Reif was clearly troubled by the results and said he was "disturbed by the extent and nature of the problem." 
  • Officer Response to People with Mental Illnesses: Law enforcement and campus public safety officers nationwide commonly respond to calls for service that involve people with mental illnesses. The nature of law enforcement responses to people with mental illnesses is complex and these encounters can be time-consuming and affect the officers, people with mental illnesses and their families, the community and the criminal justice system.

Open Issue


October 22, 2014

In this issue:

  • Final VAWA Amendments to Clery Act Published: On Monday, October 20th, the US Department of Education (ED) released the final regulations outlining the new changes to the Clery Act by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). The final regulations officially go into effect July 1, 2015, although ED already stated that institutions of higher education (IHEs) are expected to make a "good faith effort" to comply with the new regulations until that time. 
  • October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month: One in four women will experience domestic violence during her lifetime. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), defines domestic violence as "a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person."

Open Issue


October 15, 2014

In this issue:

  • Butane Hash Oil: Public Safety and Officer Awareness: The popularity of butane hash oil (BHO), also known as "honey oil," "dabs," "shatter," or "wax," has increased over the last several years. The production process typically involves filling a tube with marijuana and using butane to extract and concentrate tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), leaving a sticky yellow residue, known as BHO. This manufacturing process can lead to fires and explosions, some of which have been reported in the news as occurring on college campuses. With individual states legalizing and decriminalizing marijuana, there is an increased potential that BHO labs will become more prevalent. 
  • White House Releases Updated Title IX Guidance Documents: Recently, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault released four new, updated Title IX documents via the Not Alone website...

Open Issue


October 8, 2014

In this issue:

  • Protecting Your Institution's Electronic Information: According to the Student and Employee's Electronic Information brief, written by the Vermont Intelligence Center (VIC) and the Center for Internet Security (CIS), most college and university networks employ an open structure making them harder to secure. With thousands of students and staff members logging in with their own computers, the external shells of these systems must remain somewhat penetrable. CIS studied 166 incidents reported and/or documented in open source databases between 2012 and 2013 in which an attack by an external, malicious actor led to a data breach. Malicious actors targeted educational institutions in 46% of these incidents. Training students and personnel about cyber attacks, such as phishing and watering hole attacks, may help reduce the likelihood of successful attacks via these methods. 
  • Building and Maintaining Successful Community Relations: Trust is the foundation of a successful partnership or relationship between public safety organizations, including campus public safety, and the diverse and multicultural communities they serve. These relationships are essential to the creation and sustainment of safe, supportive and socially just communities, and prove mutually beneficial for both public safety officials and their communities for the following reasons...

Open Issue

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