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National Center for Campus Public Safety

Weekly Snapshot Archives - 2019/06

June 26, 2019

In this issue:

  • SUNY Announces New SPARC Upgrade: In 2019, the State University of New York (SUNY), in collaboration with the City University of New York (CUNY), launched a significant upgrade to the Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Response Course (SPARC), an online training system to assist colleges and universities in training students, especially more difficult to reach or underserved populations including non-traditional, distance education, part-time, and military students.
  • Safety Tips for the July 4th Holiday: Although some colleges and universities are closed for the summer, many have summer programs, courses, or year-round schedules that mean students are on campus during the summer months. It's important to share safety tips with your campus community for the July Fourth holiday, especially since fireworks, heat, impaired driving, and other risks go hand-in-hand.

Open Issue


June 19, 2019

In this issue: 

  • PTSD Awareness: June is PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) Awareness Month and June 27 is PTSD Awareness Day, originally designated by the U.S. Senate in 2014 and 2010, respectively. PTSD is a mental health problem that some people may develop after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event such as military combat, sexual assault, a natural disaster, or a car accident. For some people, incidents like these evoke upsetting memories or create problems returning to their normal routine for several weeks or months. Not every person develops chronic (ongoing) or acute (short-term) PTSD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD. 
  • Have You Applied for HSIN Access?: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to sharing timely, relevant, and accurate information with its campus safety and law enforcement partners. Members of these communities raised questions about access to intelligence and analytical products, noting that these items are essential for maintaining situational awareness and safety. To meet these needs, the Office of Partnership and Engagement/Office for State and Local Law Enforcement, with assistance from the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis, is facilitating requests for Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN) membership for interested campus safety/police departments.

Open Issue


June 12, 2019

In this issue:

  • Ten Keys to Improving Emergency Alerts, Warnings & Notifications: In April 2019, SAFECOM and the National Council of Statewide Interoperability Coordinators, in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, developed the Ten Keys to Improving Emergency Alerts, Warnings, and Notifications as recommendations to help organizations enhance critical information sharing. This is inclusive of information on emergency alerts, warnings, and notification (AWN) systems that help protect lives and property by identifying information about an impending threat, communicating that information to those who need it, and facilitating the timely taking of protective actions. The Ten Keys are recommended for integration into the existing structures of all alert originators, such as campus public safety and police departments, partners, and stakeholders.
  • Police-Mental Health Collaborations: Six Questions to Ask: Police officers are increasingly asked to respond to calls for service involving people who may be experiencing a mental health crisis or other mental health need. They may be the first, and only, responder on the scene of a situation that can be more complex and time-consuming than many officers are trained to address. Police departments are increasingly reaching out to those in the behavioral health system, a promising trend and one that has historically highlighted the pervasive gap in mental health services. This is particularly true across college and university campuses where the exponential growth of students suffering from anxiety and depression continues to grow and outpaces clinical services and counseling staff available.

Open Issue


June 5, 2019

In this issue:

  • Student Anxiety Continues to Rise, Part 2: Campus Response: Last week in "Student Anxiety Continues to Rise, Part 1: The Data," we examined recent preliminary findings from researchers at the University of California Berkeley Institute for the Future of Young Americans at the Goldman School of Public Policy that found the percent of students who reported being diagnosed or treated for anxiety disorder in the last 12 months doubled between 2008 and 2016 from 10 to 20 percent. This week, we take a look at how colleges and universities have been responding to the increase in student mental health issues such as anxiety and depression.
  • Food Insecurity on Campus: Discussions regarding the affordability of a higher education degree generally include the amount of financial aid students and families qualify for, rising tuition costs, student loan debt, and the amount of money people have available to use for education. These are the high costs, and while an important part of the conversation, aren't representative of the whole picture. For many students, the affordability of attending a college or university also comes down to questions about their daily basic needs such as: Can I afford something to eat today?

Open Issue

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