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National Center for Campus Public Safety

Weekly Snapshot

The Weekly Snapshot, our electronic bulletin, features timely resources and information for campus communities, public safety and emergency management officials, law enforcement officers, and others interested in making campuses safer. The bulletin includes reports and studies issued from government agencies, non-profit organizations, and professional associations on topics such as sexual assault, mental health, travel and study abroad safety, community relations, harassment, and emergency preparedness. In addition, the Weekly Snapshot provides information on national monthly observances and campaign organization, legislative updates, federal awareness bulletins, and information on upcoming events and professional training opportunities. Anyone may subscribe to this email communication, along with other NCCPS notifications, by joining our mailing list.

We have compiled our past Weekly Snapshot articles into one easily accessible and searchable location, the Weekly Snapshot Directory. This directory will be updated monthly.


December 5, 2018

In this issue:

  • New Exercise Starter Kits Available for Active Shooter Incidents: Last week, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Office of Academic Engagement (OAE) released new exercise starter kits (ESK) for the K-12 academic community as part of the Campus Resilience Program. OAE previously released ESKs for the higher education community in June 2018. The ESKs are self-conducted tabletop exercises that include a set of scalable tools to help K-12 schools and institutions of higher education test existing emergency plans, protocols, and procedures.
  • Terrorism Prevention and Countering Violent Extremism Research Library: The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate's (S&T) mission is to enable effective, efficient, and secure operations across all homeland security missions. To counter the continually growing and changing threat of violent extremism, S&T developed a free and publicly accessible research findings dashboard that hosts more than 1,500 catalogued terrorism prevention and countering violent extremism research documents.

Open Issue


November 28, 2018

In this issue:

  • New Proposed Title IX Regulations Released: On November 16, 2018 the U.S. Department of Education (ED) released proposed Title IX regulations. Title IX is the federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities that receive federal funding. The draft of the new regulations come more than a year after previous Title IX guidance was rescinded and ED provided temporary guidance by a Dear Colleague Letter and accompanying Questions and Answers. The proposed regulations are publicized after ED undertook research that included gathering input from students, advocates, school administrators, Title IX coordinators, and other stakeholders.
  • Assisting People with Disabilities During Evacuations: As awareness surrounding the needs of people with disabilities on college and university campuses continues to increase, it is helpful for campus public safety professionals to maintain their education on proper and effective mechanisms to assist people with disabilities before and during emergency situations.

Open Issue


November 21, 2018

In this issue: 

  • 2017 Hate Crime Statistics: On November 13, the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program released its annual Hate Crimes Statistics, which includes hate crime information for 2017, broken down by location, offenders, bias types, and victims. The number of hate crimes increased by 17% between 2016 and 2017, and the number of agencies reporting hate crimes to the FBI continues to grow.
  • Violent Crime Reduction: Last month, the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Major Cities Chiefs Association released the Violent Crime Reduction Operations Guide in an effort to address ways in which law enforcement can successfully combat violent crime. While there is discussion about and research on the increase and/or decrease in crime in the U.S., how violent crime is felt in communities and how policing executives respond is nuanced. Each jurisdiction has its own unique set of challenges, stakeholders, and resources making a singular or static solution unlikely to be effective.

Open Issue


November 14, 2018

In this issue: 

  • Law Enforcement and Victim Compensation: This fall, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in partnership with the National Center for Victims of Crime and the Police Foundation, announced a variety of new materials and resources designed to assist law enforcement in providing essential information about victim compensation to crime victims.
  • New EVAWI Training Bulletin Explores the Question of Bias in Sexual Assault Interviews: As professionals and the public become aware of the Start by Believing philosophy, they have asked important questions: Is Start by Believing just another form of bias? Does it replace the historic bias against victims with a new bias against suspects? The new End Violence Against Women International training bulletin, Interviews with Victims vs. Suspects: Start by Believing and the Question of Bias, addresses such questions, with particular focus on criminal justice professionals, especially sexual assault investigators.

Open Issue


November 7, 2018

In this issue:

  • New Toolkit Addresses Alcohol's Role in Campus Sexual Assault: Existing research and guidance from organizations stress the importance of consistency between alcohol use/abuse prevention efforts and sexual assault prevention efforts that use individual, relationship, community, and policy-level strategies. However, there is limited guidance for sexual assault prevention specialists on how to do so. To address this gap, the Campus Advocacy and Prevention Professionals Association released Addressing Alcohol's Role in Campus Sexual Assault: A Toolkit by and for Prevention Specialists.
  • Financial Preparedness is Part of Emergency Preparedness: When we discuss emergency preparedness, people most often think about physical safety, particularly after natural disasters or unexpected emergency incidents. However, there is an important aspect of emergency preparedness that is often overlooked, financial preparedness. Helping college students learn financial literacy by using the Emergency Financial First Aid Kit is a way to prepare them for the future.

Open Issue


October 31, 2018

In this issue:

  • New NCCPS Forum Report on Preventing Violence in Campus Communities: A group of campus safety leaders, with support from the National Center for Campus Public Safety, gathered in Charlotte, North Carolina in July 2018 to discuss the challenges campus safety departments face and uncover promising practices for addressing them. Today, we are pleased to release the resulting report, The Roles and Strategies of Campus Safety Teams for Preventing Violence in College and University Campus Communities.
  • Behavioral Health Resource Kit Available from SAMHSA: The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) prepared the Behavioral Health Among College Students Information & Resource Kit for college and university prevention practitioners, health center staff, and administrators. SAMHSA encourages campus administrators and staff to share this document with local community partners who may assist with this important work.

Open Issue


October 24, 2018

In this issue: 

  • Beyond Awareness: Student-Led Innovation in Campus Mental Health: Concerns about mental health in higher education have grown and gained attention in recent years. Since the 1990s, university and college counseling centers have been experiencing a shift in the needs of students seeking counseling services from developmental and informational needs to psychological problems. In the 2014 National Survey of College Counseling Centers, respondents reported that 52 percent of their clients had severe psychological problems, an increase from 44 percent in 2013.
  • Fentanyl Safety Recommendations for First Responders: Law enforcement officers, firefighters, emergency medical services providers, and other first responders are increasingly likely to encounter fentanyl and other synthetic opioids during the course of their daily activities, such as overdose calls, traffic stops, arrests, and searches. To help first responders protect themselves when the presence of fentanyl is suspected or encountered, a federal interagency working group coordinated by the National Security Council developed the one-age resource, Fentanyl Safety Recommendations for First Responders, and a companion training video, Fentanyl: The Real Deal.
  • Bias Crime Assessment Tool from the Vera Institute of Justice: This August, with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, the Vera Institute of Justice published Bias Crime Assessment: A Tool and Guidelines for Law Enforcement and Concerned Communities. The Bias Crime Assessment Tool (BCAT) was designed to improve the reporting of hate incidents and crimes and is intended to be used in a wide variety of settings including schools/campuses, law enforcement, victim advocacy, community/civil rights advocacy, health care, or other social service agencies that may be responsible for identifying and responding to victims of hate.

Open Issue


October 17, 2018

In this issue:

  • Promote a Drug Free and Healthy Lifestyle with the Red Ribbon Campaign: A national leader in drug prevention, education, and advocacy, the National Family Partnership sponsors the annual National Red Ribbon Campaign®. The Red Ribbon Campaign is the oldest and largest drug prevention program in the nation, reaching millions of young people during Red Ribbon Week®, October 23 - 31 each year. Red Ribbon Week is an ideal way for individuals and communities to unite and take a visible stand against drugs.
  • NOVA Campus Advocacy Training: The National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) is now enrolling for their Winter 2019 NOVA Campus Advocacy Training. Offered in partnership with the Campus Advocacy & Prevention Professionals Association, this 24-hour, live, distance learning academy focuses on building participants' knowledge and skills to respond to sexual assault, stalking, and interpersonal violence in higher education. You must be a campus-based advocate or community-based advocate providing services on a college campus to apply.
  • Crime Prevention Month: For 30 years, the National Crime Prevention Council has spread awareness and education messages during Crime Prevention Month ranging from personal and home safety to community preparedness and identity theft. This year's theme is Keeping Our Communities Safe, with a focus on safe firearms practices.

Open Issue


October 10, 2018

In this issue:

  • PERF Releases New Guidebook for Law Enforcement's Response to Sexual Assault: This summer, the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) published the Executive Guidebook: Practical Approaches for Strengthening Law Enforcement's Response to Sexual Assault. The Executive Guidebook is the product of six years of work resulting from a 2012 cooperative agreement awarded to PERF and the Women's Law Project of Philadelphia by the Office on Violence Against Women Technical Assistance Program to help law enforcement agencies improve their handling of sexual assault cases through the development of internal guidelines and quality assurance mechanisms.
  • Invisible Disabilities Week: You may be asking, what is an invisible disability? In simple terms, an invisible disability is a physical, mental or neurological condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities that is invisible to the onlooker. Unfortunately, the fact that a person's symptoms are invisible often leads to misunderstandings, false perceptions, and judgments. Also, an invisible disability does not mean a person is disabled. Many living with these challenges are still fully active in their work, families, sports, or hobbies.

Open Issue


October 3, 2018

In this issue:

  • October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month: Domestic Violence Awareness Month, a national annual observance, evolved from the "Day of Unity" held in October 1981 and conceived by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Domestic violence affects individuals of all ages, races, ethnicities, socioeconomic statuses, and religions, and happens regardless of sexual orientation. This violence occurs in both dating relationships and marriages, and occurs on and off college and university campuses.
  • Mental Illness Awareness Week: Attitudes that view symptoms of mental health issues as threatening and uncomfortable frequently foster stigma and discrimination towards people affected by these issues. People brave enough to admit they have a mental health problem often face forms of exclusion, discrimination, and bullying. Mental health stigma can be divided into two types: social stigma and perceived stigma or self-stigma. This Mental Illness Awareness Week, join the National Alliance on Mental Illness in educating the public, fighting stigma, and providing support.

Open Issue



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