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National Center for Campus Public Safety

Weekly Snapshot

The Weekly Snapshot, our electronic bulletin, features timely resources and information for campus communities, public safety and emergency management officials, law enforcement officers, and others interested in making campuses safer. The bulletin includes reports and studies issued from government agencies, non-profit organizations, and professional associations on topics such as sexual assault, mental health, travel and study abroad safety, community relations, harassment, and emergency preparedness. In addition, the Weekly Snapshot provides information on national monthly observances and campaign organization, legislative updates, federal awareness bulletins, and information on upcoming events and professional training opportunities. Anyone may subscribe to this email communication, along with other NCCPS notifications, by joining our mailing list.

We have compiled our past Weekly Snapshot articles into one easily accessible and searchable location, the Weekly Snapshot Directory. This directory will be updated monthly.


June 12, 2019

In this issue:

  • Ten Keys to Improving Emergency Alerts, Warnings & Notifications: In April 2019, SAFECOM and the National Council of Statewide Interoperability Coordinators, in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, developed the Ten Keys to Improving Emergency Alerts, Warnings, and Notifications as recommendations to help organizations enhance critical information sharing. This is inclusive of information on emergency alerts, warnings, and notification (AWN) systems that help protect lives and property by identifying information about an impending threat, communicating that information to those who need it, and facilitating the timely taking of protective actions. The Ten Keys are recommended for integration into the existing structures of all alert originators, such as campus public safety and police departments, partners, and stakeholders.
  • Police-Mental Health Collaborations: Six Questions to Ask: Police officers are increasingly asked to respond to calls for service involving people who may be experiencing a mental health crisis or other mental health need. They may be the first, and only, responder on the scene of a situation that can be more complex and time-consuming than many officers are trained to address. Police departments are increasingly reaching out to those in the behavioral health system, a promising trend and one that has historically highlighted the pervasive gap in mental health services. This is particularly true across college and university campuses where the exponential growth of students suffering from anxiety and depression continues to grow and outpaces clinical services and counseling staff available.

Open Issue


June 5, 2019

In this issue:

  • Student Anxiety Continues to Rise, Part 2: Campus Response: Last week in "Student Anxiety Continues to Rise, Part 1: The Data," we examined recent preliminary findings from researchers at the University of California Berkeley Institute for the Future of Young Americans at the Goldman School of Public Policy that found the percent of students who reported being diagnosed or treated for anxiety disorder in the last 12 months doubled between 2008 and 2016 from 10 to 20 percent. This week, we take a look at how colleges and universities have been responding to the increase in student mental health issues such as anxiety and depression.
  • Food Insecurity on Campus: Discussions regarding the affordability of a higher education degree generally include the amount of financial aid students and families qualify for, rising tuition costs, student loan debt, and the amount of money people have available to use for education. These are the high costs, and while an important part of the conversation, aren't representative of the whole picture. For many students, the affordability of attending a college or university also comes down to questions about their daily basic needs such as: Can I afford something to eat today?

Open Issue


May 29, 2019

In this issue: 

  • LGBT Pride Month: Supporting Transgender People on Campus: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month (LGBT Pride Month) is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall uprising in Greenwich Village and recognize the impact that LGBT individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally. While June is outside of the typical academic calendar for the majority of college and university students, many activities and events are held on or near campuses. The month of observation also serves as an opportunity for colleges and universities to review their efforts to support the variety of people living, working, and studying in their communities.
  • Student Anxiety Continues to Rise, Part 1: The Data: Anxiety disorder among college students continues to rise, according to preliminary findings from researchers at the University of California (UC) Berkeley Institute for the Future of Young Americans at the Goldman School of Public Policy. The two-page release, Anxiety Disorder on College Campuses: The New Epidemic, found that nationally the percent of students who reported being diagnosed or treated for anxiety disorder in the last 12 months doubled between 2008 and 2016 from 10 to 20 percent. This confirms annual findings from the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors that anxiety continues to be the most frequent concern amongst college students.

Open Issue


May 22, 2019

In this issue:

  • The National Domestic Preparedness Consortium Focuses on Campus Safety: The National Domestic Preparedness Consortium (NDPC), a professional alliance sponsored through the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency National Preparedness Directorate, released its 2018 annual report. Since 1998, NDPC has provided no-cost training to nearly 3 million emergency responders across state, local, tribal, and territorial jurisdictions. This year's report primarily focuses on school and campus safety and natural disasters.
  • June is National Safety Month: Preventable injury-related deaths have increased since 2012 and are now the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind heart disease and cancer for all age groups, and the leading cause of death for those aged 1 to 44. The National Safety Council is focused on saving lives and preventing injuries, including raising public awareness about the opioid epidemic, helping to reduce motor vehicle crashes, and improving safety practices in the workplace. National Safety Month, observed annually in June, focuses on reducing the leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road, and in our homes and communities.

Open Issue


May 15, 2019

In this issue:

  • Department of Justice Releases Reports on Improving Officer Safety and Wellness: On April 17, the U.S. Department of Justice announced the publication of two complementary reports that focus on improving the safety and wellness of the nation's 800,000 law enforcement officers. The reports, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress and Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, are the result of the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act, which was passed in 2017 and requires the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services to submit reports to Congress.
  • National Military Appreciation Month: There are numerous services available to military members, both active and reserve, and taking time to highlight these tools to enable campuses to provide support to this population is an important part of National Military Appreciation Month. The following resources can be added to the growing list of valuable information on this topic that we have highlighted in the previous Weekly Snapshot articles: "Supporting Student Veterans on Campus" and "Recognizing and Supporting Military Members and Veterans on Campus."

Open Issue


May 8, 2019

In this issue:

  • Inspire Action and Change Lives During National Prevention Week: Colleges and universities, behavioral health coalitions, community-based organizations, and others with a role in prevention are gearing up for this year's National Prevention Week (NPW). NPW takes place May 12-18, 2019 and is a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)-sponsored campaign dedicated to increasing the prevention of substance use and promotion of mental health by promoting prevention year-round. NPW is timed to allow schools to plan or take part in a prevention-themed event before the school year ends, raising awareness among students of all ages.
  • Annual Indicators of School Crime and Safety 2018 Report Released: On April 17, the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics released the annual report, Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2018. This report provides data on crime and safety at K-12 schools and institutions of higher education from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and campus safety and security. The indicators cover topics such as violent deaths; victimization; school environment; fear and avoidance; and postsecondary campus safety and security.

Open Issue


May 1, 2019

In this issue:

  • Recognizing and Supporting Military Members and Veterans on Campus: In 1999, Congress designated May as National Military Appreciation Month. Most colleges and universities have active service military or veterans on their campus as faculty, staff, or students. It is important during this busy academic time of year to take time to pause and appreciate service members and evaluate the support and resources being provided to this population.
  • National Police Week 2019: This year marks the 57th annual observance of National Police Week, which begins on Sunday, May 12 and runs through Saturday, May 18. National Police Week pays special recognition to law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others. It is a collaborative effort by many organizations working together to honor those in the U.S. law enforcement community.

Open Issue


April 24, 2019

In this issue:

  • Help Spread Awareness During Mental Health Month: Each May in the U.S., we observe Mental Health Month (MHM) to help raise awareness, reduce stigma, provide support, and advocate for policies to help the 60 million Americans that live with mental illness. For 2019, Mental Health America is expanding upon last year's MHM theme of #4Mind4Body.
  • 2019 Communities Talk Stipends for Institutions of Higher Education: In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of alcohol addiction, Alcohol Awareness Month is a time to celebrate the efforts of campuses and communities across the country who are working together to prevent underage alcohol use. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Survey on Drug Use and Health, there has been a dramatic decrease over the past 15 years in the percentage of 12- to 20-year-olds who report any lifetime alcohol use.

Open Issue


April 17, 2019

In this issue:

  • Social Norms in Alcohol Abuse Prevention: Alcohol Awareness Month is a public health program organized by Facing Addiction with NCADD designed to increase outreach and education regarding the dangers of alcoholism and issues related to alcohol. As Alcohol Awareness Month continues, one focus on college campuses is prevention. One prevention mechanism that has shown great efficacy is the social norms approach.
  • Law Enforcement Standards and Training: Training opportunities for law enforcement personnel and campus safety officers are varied and offered from a variety of federal and state agencies, for-profit and nonprofit entities, and professional associations across the country. The mission of the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST) is to research, develop, and share information, ideas, and innovations that assist states in establishing effective and defensible standards for employment and training of law enforcement officers, and, in those states where dual responsibility exists, correctional personnel.

Open Issue


April 10, 2019

In this issue:

  • National Recommendations for Depicting Suicide and Additional Resources: The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention released National Recommendations for Depicting Suicide in collaboration with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Entertainment Industries Council. The recommendations, which were informed by both representatives from the entertainment industry and the suicide prevention field, aim to help members of the entertainment industry - content creators, scriptwriters, producers - tell more balanced and authentic stories involving suicide and suicide prevention.
  • April is Alcohol Awareness Month: "Help for Today, Hope for Tomorrow" is the theme of this year's Alcohol Awareness Month, a national grassroots effort observed each April by campuses and communities to support prevention, research, education, intervention, treatment, and recovery from alcoholism and alcohol-related problems. The 2019 theme is designed to help reduce the stigma often associated with alcohol addiction and to highlight the reality that help is available and recovery is possible.

Open Issue



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